The Hill;
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Why does Libya needs another “International Intervention”? …International Intervention
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The West is looking for a few good “Authoritarian yet secular regimes”:

"In her autobiographical work, based on her tenure as U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton makes a startling statement while explaining the need for U.S. intervention around the world, despite the “dangers” to American lives. “While we can and must work to reduce the danger,” writes Ms. Clinton, “the only way to eliminate risk entirely is to retreat entirely and to accept the consequences of the void we leave behind. When America is absent, extremism takes root, our interests suffer, and our security at home is threatened” (Hard Choices, p.387, Simon & Schuster, 2014).

It is curious that Ms. Clinton thinks that extremism thrives when America is absent, as empirical facts and the patterns one can glean from them indicate that the opposite is truer. While Iraq and ISIS’ brutal advance on Baghdad is at the top of the news now, it must be remembered that each of the countries today at the centre of the world’s concerns over extremism is in fact a country that has seen direct or indirect western intervention, not western absence — Afghanistan, Syria, Libya and Iraq.
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Suhasini Haidar: Wars without winners, The Hindu H/t: WatchingAmerica

"There are other patterns to these interventions. In each of these countries, what the United States, along with allies sought to oust were authoritarian regimes that were secular. The Soviet-backed regimes of President Najibullah in Afghanistan, President Bashar al-Assad in Syria, Saddam Hussein in Iraq and Muammar Qadhafi in Libya.

The movements these leaders set up were dictatorial; they controlled their people through stifling intelligence agencies, and crushed all political Islamic movements where they could. But a by-product of the secularism was that women and minorities had a more secure status under these regimes than under their Islamist and monarchist neighbours like Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait and Bahrain.

Unlike them, Mr. Assad, Qadhafi, Saddam and Najibullah had women and minorities in their cabinets, and a sense of Arab/Afghan nationalism overshadowed the sectarian divide in their countries….”

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"Children in the Crossfire" Ernesto López Portillo at El Universal (Mexico) about America’s Child Migration ‘problem’ @watchingamerica
Honduras could represent a typical example of a state’s progressive collapse because of its increased number of child emigrants, 14,000 of which have entered the United States illegally from October 2013 to June 2014. I listened to experts on the issue affirm that this crisis can no longer be explained by the allure of the American Dream, but instead by their home countries’ collapse and the children’s resulting displacement.
I wonder how THAT happened? Could it be … US Destabilization? There are Death Squads operating in Honduras again. Even the chief of Hondura’s “Police” is dirty. He’s ALSO "…the U.S. government’s go-to man in Honduras for the war on drug trafficking.". eg. CIA affiliated. Double Dirty.
The Honduran Coup chronicled @Razed by Wolves by Cabale News Service and more.
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According to the New York Times, the overweening implication is “This is how we’re going to let Syria’s power elite ‘legally’ loot Syria and bring it to the US.”

As a practical matter, the decision confers foreign mission status on the Syrian opposition’s offices in Washington and New York — a step short of full diplomatic status. That will make it easier for the United States to provide security and to expedite banking transfers In Full
…like a transferring back to the US of the the $27 million the State Dept just gave them, when they flee. I wonder if the money is being delivered on pallets, like the US government did for Iraq, or in shopping bags, like they do with ol’ Hamid Karzai in Afghanistan?

BBCNews:
    ”The US has said it will allow Syria’s main opposition alliance to open a diplomatic mission in Washington.

    The state department announced an additional $27m (£16m) in non-lethal assistance, and the stepping up of deliveries to the Free Syrian Army

(Pistols and other police related arms MIGHT qualify as nonlethal aid… and BEWARE! Dick Durbin “Thinks” → “…I think, beyond nonlethal aid, we have to put on the table the possibility of small arms sales.”, meaning M-16s. see this ‘nonlethal aid’ definition -ed).

    The move comes ahead of talks between senior US officials and Ahmed Jarba, president of the National Coalition.

    The US first recognised the group as the legitimate representative of the Syrian people in December 2012.

    The move does not mean the US recognises the National Coalition as Syria’s government, nor grant its members diplomatic immunity,” More @ BBC
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