"As went #OccupyWallStreet’s Meme-Gone-Brand-Name, usurped by politicians of all political stripes and intents, so goes Turkey’s #Direngeziparki rebellion. More proof social insurrections should voluntarily dissolve (or better, morph into full scale rebellion) rather than be crushed OR co-opted.

    Protests began in Turkey in May of 2013, allegedly over the government’s plans to develop a park in Istanbul (actually,it began as reaction to the construction of the 93rd shopping mall on a green area in Turkey -ed).

    While the Western media attempted to portray the growing unrest as “grassroots” and leaderless, in fact, the opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) was behind it from the beginning.[—-]

So it comes to pass:

    CHP’s leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu, currently seeking (prime minister) Erdogan’s job, was in the United States on December 2, 2013 to give a talk (pdf here) before the corporate-funded policy think tank, the Brookings Institution. His warm welcome and announcement of a CHP chapter opening in Washington D.C. was only matched by his eagerness to fully integrate Turkey with the European Union…"

Turmoil in Turkey and Washington’s Short Leash… Including “What the West Wants From Turkey Regarding Crimea”, by Tony Cartalucci @ Near East Outlook

My archive of posts tagged: Taksim, Direngeziparki etc.

"

…several decades ago, thinkers like Huxley, Orwell and others prophesied societies in which we now live. We are still reading ‘1984’ or ‘Brave New World’ with disgust, and with outrage. We read those books as though they are some imaginary, science-fiction horror, not realizing that those nightmares, actually, have already arrived in our countries, cities, even into our own living rooms.

As many nations, including those in Europe and North America, increasingly succumb to indoctrination and intellectual homogeneity, courage is vanishing. It is demonstrated very infrequently, and it clearly fails to inspire the majority.

It is not because ‘people have changed’, but because the world in which we are living is becoming increasingly compliant and restrained, and the main sources of information (mass media), as well as those sources that shape public opinion and the behavioral patterns of the citizens (social media), are fully controlled by corporate and conservative political groups and their interests…

"

Andre Vltchek, I am Scared, Therefore I am Brave!

Recently, my Italian translator, Giuseppe, wrote me an email. It was not a typical exchange, but quite an extraordinary personal query:

    “Many see you as a very courageous person. They would like to imitate you at that, at least a little bit, but they feel they are not courageous, say, ‘by nature’ and they cannot learn courage. What do you think about that? Can people train themselves to be courageous?

I do not know how to answer this question in brief, and definitely not in the body of an email, not in just a few words. But the question is important, maybe essential, and so I decided to reply by writing this essay…

I am no longer accepting the things I ‘cannot change’.I am changing the things I cannot accept.Source, Call Me Ishmael @Twitter

I am no longer accepting the things I ‘cannot change’.
I am changing the things I cannot accept.

Source, Call Me Ishmael @Twitter

"And that — that brings me to the second mode of civil disobedience.

There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart that you can’t take part! You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus — and you’ve got to make it stop!

And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it — that unless you’re free the machine will be prevented from working at all !!!

That doesn’t mean — I know it will be interpreted to mean, unfortunately, by the bigots who run The (Hearst-owned San Francisco) Examiner, for example — That doesn’t mean that you have to break anything.

One thousand people sitting down some place, not letting anybody by, not [letting] anything happen, can stop any machine, including this machine! And it will stop!!

We’re gonna do the following…

"

— Mario Savio’s Free Speech Movement Sit-in Address on the Steps of Sproul Hall UC Berkeley, 2 December 1964. COMPLETE transcript and footage @AmericanRhetoric

"The real owners are the big wealthy business interests that control things and make all the important decisions.

Forget the politicians, they’re an irrelevancy. The politicians are put there to give you the idea that you have freedom of choice. You don’t. You have no choice. You have owners.

They own you. They own everything. They own all the important land. They own and control the corporations. They’ve long since bought and paid for the Senate, the Congress, the statehouses, the city halls. They’ve got the judges in their back pockets. And they own all the big media companies, so that they control just about all of the news and information you hear.

They’ve got you by the balls.

They spend billions of dollars every year lobbying ­ lobbying to get what they want. Well, we know what they want; they want more for themselves and less for everybody else.

But I’ll tell you what they don’t want…”

"

— George Carlin, The Real Owners Of America
Image, Getty via Wall Street Journal: “Why the Rich Fear Violence in the Streets” Part 1 @ Auntie Imperial’s News & Blog Review

Razer’s note: As I’ve said all along, Occupy WAS NOT a “Revolution”. It was an “Insurrection” with people involved from all sides of the US sociopolitical spectrum from Black Bloc Anarchists to Progressive LIberals, Teabaggers, 9/11 Truthers, and even a contingent of LaRouchite culties. From those scattered social/political roots, NOTHING long-lasting and substantial in the way of structural change to the system we mutually oppose can be expected to occur.But it’s important to understand  the nature of insurrections, as well as  their pitfalls. Insurrections only have two possible outcomes. They dissolve, or  they’re crushed. Dissolution is obviously preferable strategically and tactically, but note, unless we all take the lessons learned from Occupy forward to the groups, organization, cells, we’re typically involved with, or for the previously uninvolved, the group we now involved ourselves with post-occupy, and KEEP THE PRESSURE ON, the powers that be… The “State” if you would, will just use events like Occupy or the “Arab Spring” to make absolutely sure it would NOT occur again.Lessons Learned (Occupy-ers Should Learn Them Too): On Libya, the Arab Spring and Syria - Tariq Ali InterviewedTariq Ali was interviewed on events in the Middle East by Swedish journalists S. Eriksson, M. Fahlgren and P. Widén. This interview also appears in the Swedish paper  Internationalen.

Question 1: In your text  What is a revolution  you start with the following sentence:Ever since the beginning of the Arab Spring there has been much talk of revolutions. Not from me. I’ve argued against the position that mass uprisings on their own constitute a revolution, i.e., a transfer of power from one social class (or even a layer) to another that leads to fundamental change. 

Your article has been hotly debated amongst revolutionary Marxists in Sweden. Some say that you can’t differ between a social and a political revolution. A political revolution being a radical political transformation of power, but where the change might not include change of social system.

So our question is: How do you think these concepts (social and political revolution) should be used and how do you reach your view that what happens in the Arab countries could not be seen as a revolutionary process, not even a political?

Tariq Ali: I am fully aware of the concept of political revolutions. After all, that is what we hoped might happen in the USSR and Eastern Europe but what actually happened was capitalist restoration. My position on the character of revolutions was sketched out in the New Left Review debate with Asef Bayat some months ago and those interested can read both sides of the argument [http://newleftreview.org/II/80/tariq-ali-between-past-and-future].

 The closest we have come to in terms of ‘political revolutions’ is in South America, though here too I have refrained from describing the mass mobilizations and subsequent electoral victories as revolutions. Why? Because even in Venezuela, despite important structural reforms (education, health, land distribution, an ultra-democratic Constitution) the traditional state structures remain intact and ultimately could lead to defeat unless new institutions and social changes take place. In today’s world especially political revolutions require an assault on the old regime and its institutions. Some of this has happened in South America. None of it has happened in the Arab world.

If we want to describe important uprisings for democratic rights and institutions as political revolutions, we can of course do so, but it creates illusions. Better to be hard-headed and recognize present day realities. The only result of this word-play has been to send tiny forces from the tiny far-left in the direction of imperialism… In Full @CounterPunch
Razer’s note: As I’ve said all along, Occupy WAS NOT a “Revolution”. It was an “Insurrection” with people involved from all sides of the US sociopolitical spectrum from Black Bloc Anarchists to Progressive LIberals, Teabaggers, 9/11 Truthers, and even a contingent of LaRouchite culties. From those scattered social/political roots, NOTHING long-lasting and substantial in the way of structural change to the system we mutually oppose can be expected to occur.

But it’s important to understand the nature of insurrections, as well as their pitfalls. Insurrections only have two possible outcomes. They dissolve, or they’re crushed. Dissolution is obviously preferable strategically and tactically, but note, unless we all take the lessons learned from Occupy forward to the groups, organization, cells, we’re typically involved with, or for the previously uninvolved, the group we now involved ourselves with post-occupy, and KEEP THE PRESSURE ON, the powers that be… The “State” if you would, will just use events like Occupy or the “Arab Spring” to make absolutely sure it would NOT occur again.

Lessons Learned (Occupy-ers Should Learn Them Too):
On Libya, the Arab Spring and Syria - Tariq Ali Interviewed


Tariq Ali was interviewed on events in the Middle East by Swedish journalists S. Eriksson, M. Fahlgren and P. Widén. This interview also appears in the Swedish paper Internationalen.
Question 1: In your text What is a revolution you start with the following sentence:

Ever since the beginning of the Arab Spring there has been much talk of revolutions. Not from me. I’ve argued against the position that mass uprisings on their own constitute a revolution, i.e., a transfer of power from one social class (or even a layer) to another that leads to fundamental change.
Your article has been hotly debated amongst revolutionary Marxists in Sweden. Some say that you can’t differ between a social and a political revolution. A political revolution being a radical political transformation of power, but where the change might not include change of social system.

So our question is: How do you think these concepts (social and political revolution) should be used and how do you reach your view that what happens in the Arab countries could not be seen as a revolutionary process, not even a political?


Tariq Ali: I am fully aware of the concept of political revolutions. After all, that is what we hoped might happen in the USSR and Eastern Europe but what actually happened was capitalist restoration. My position on the character of revolutions was sketched out in the New Left Review debate with Asef Bayat some months ago and those interested can read both sides of the argument [http://newleftreview.org/II/80/tariq-ali-between-past-and-future].

The closest we have come to in terms of ‘political revolutions’ is in South America, though here too I have refrained from describing the mass mobilizations and subsequent electoral victories as revolutions.

Why? Because even in Venezuela, despite important structural reforms (education, health, land distribution, an ultra-democratic Constitution) the traditional state structures remain intact and ultimately could lead to defeat unless new institutions and social changes take place. In today’s world especially political revolutions require an assault on the old regime and its institutions. Some of this has happened in South America. None of it has happened in the Arab world.

If we want to describe important uprisings for democratic rights and institutions as political revolutions, we can of course do so, but it creates illusions. Better to be hard-headed and recognize present day realities. The only result of this word-play has been to send tiny forces from the tiny far-left in the direction of imperialism…

In Full @CounterPunch

gafiltha:

#War #government #revolution #people #true #American

gafiltha:

#War #government #revolution #people #true #American

(via aliyaayila-deactivated20131219)

Realtime Twitter Search for Mi’kmaq OR #Elsipogtog

Realtime Twitter Search for Mi’kmaq OR #Elsipogtog

Source: SubMediaTV

Also see these updates @ EarthFirst! NewsWire:
Full Invasion Force Arrives at Mi’kmaq Blockade
RCMP Appear to Be Withdrawing as Solidarity Protests Spread


In Full @ IdleNoMore